Forest School


Since the Spring of 2013, the Pre-School has been delighted to be able to offer a weekly Forest School visit. Thanks to local allotment holders we were able to obtain a safe and secure ‘wild’ site in the corner of the Parish allotments, which is visited, rain-or-shine, by the Pre-School staff, children and helpers.



The plot is a small, private, wooded area just a short walk from Pre-School, and we have found it the perfect spot to let the children explore, climb, dig and discover. Dilys, our Manager, completed Forest School training early in 2013 and was keen to get the initiative up and running as soon as possible. She has been key, along with other staff members and parent helpers, in implementing Forest Schools as part of the year-round curriculum, and we have all been delighted to watch  the incredible benefits for our children.


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We take everything we need along to the site on each visit. Hot chocolate and biccies to keep us going on our adventures are essential!!


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The ethos of Forest School is based on a fundamental respect for children and for their capacity to instigate, test and maintain curiosity in the world around them.


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It believes in children’s right to play; the right to access the outdoors; the right to access risk and the vibrant reality of the natural world; and the right to experience a healthy range of emotions, through all the challenges of social interaction, to build a resilience that will enable continued and creative engagement with their peers and their potential.




The woodland environment is central in supporting this dynamic approach to learning, and allows us all to consider the passage of time, the changing of the seasons, and the contemplation of ageing.



It is also an infinite source of smells, textures, sounds and tastes; a range of visual stimuli from near to far, high to low, very big to very small; and the infinite layers of historical, cultural, spiritual and mythological significance that speak of our deep relationship with trees and woodland through the ages.

Note: Thanks to FSTC for some of the above text